Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Women in Art - Video


Check out this video (link in the post headline) that shows 500 years of women portrayed in art. Incredible.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

That was absolutely amazing! I was mesmerized the whole time. How artists have taken their own visual images of women and applied them in various mediums is so entertaining to watch. I noticed how at the beginning of the video, woman looked so realistic and as time passed, the women began to look less realistic and more from the imagination of the artist. This was great! Thanks.

Anna G. 2nd

Tori Z 2nd Period said...

I loved it! The way all the pictures were seperate, yet connected. It was graceful and lovely. The colors were all different, but the subject was generally the same. I love it!!!

rosaura said...

I liked the women that were portrayed in about the first half of the video but then towards the end of the video they began to seem probably a bit to modern and I wasn't really liking those. I'm just much more attracted to the older stuff but I liked the woman at around 11 sec and overall the video was good. I had to adjust my vision a few times because it was totally wild the way it morphed, so I enjoyed it. Probably the reason for why I didn't like the more modern looking ones was that I believe that modern art just doesn't have the same emotion that art had in the 1300's and 1400's, today's art just doesn't portray the passion that artists from the Renaissance portrayed.

Bianca said...

I love this video. I noticed how the movement of brush strokes and lines aided in the morphing of the different images. The morphing seemed to be smoother between the modern art images because of the gemoetric shapes. I'm not sure if I like the end of the video with the images of modern art. Modern art seems to lack the passion of the Renaissance artists. Art should not only be produced merely to be please one's passion, but should be created with respect towards the foundations great artists who have come before has have forged.

Anonymous said...

Wow, that was really interesting! I can't believe that he could match so many of their similar features together. It was so hypnotizing and I think that it was truly creative!
- Katherine Chernova
(this is the second time that I have tried to post this, I tried to post it yesterday, but I don't see it today!?)

Paula Conway said...

This video is very interesting. It's amazing how the portrayment of women has changed through the years. I can't believe people took so much time to change the way people looked in paintings. I still think it's amazing though.

Glendon said...

That was an interesting video. What I wonder about is for what purpose many of those paintings were made. I suspect that most of the early painting were commissioned by the woman's husband/father, and served merely as another way to brag about their property (in this case, the woman who was the subject of the painting). I also notice a bit of an underrepresentation in the numbers of female artist. Out of the 90 paintings shown, only 2 of them were by female artists (√Člisabeth Louise Vig√©e-Le Brunan Mary Cassatt). While females have historically been less active in famous works of art, I would expect there to be slightly more represented in this video.

Also, I'm fairly sure that there are a wide range of computer programs you can use to morph one image into another, so the main work that the composer of this video did was choosing the images and placing them in the order he wanted (roughly chronological).

That’s probably enough cynicism from me for today.

Desiree' said...

This video caught my attention, not because the woman morphs into a different form, but because to me it is metaphor as to how Christianity has morphs or changed over the years. For example the technique that each artist uses could be compared to the way different braches of Christianity praises God in different region of the world. The simplicity or the difficulty of the use of materials could represent the richness/or lack of resources of the people had and possibly why some braches would sacrifice artifacts or build magnificent moments in the quest to be closer to God. The different interpretations of the Virgin Mary can be seen as why the many branches of Christianity sprang up to begin with. Because there are several branches of Christianity we can expect for each region of the world’s artist to see the Virgin Mary in a different artistic light. While watching the Virgin Mary morph into a different self each time it made me smile because its show how diverse she is, and how accepting of God peoples are.

By: Desiree' Daniels
6th Period

Anonymous said...

I really liked this video. The morphing technique that was used was very interesting, and gave a unity to the video. I loved the work at the beginning and middle, not so much at the end. The modern form of women seems to loose all classical elements. In an attempt to be modern and creative, the modern artist has lost all sight of his roots. Sorry, little bit of a rant, I'm not a bit fan of modern art. One unifier, especially of the non-modern pieces, is the eyes of the women. They are all either large or open wide, a facial stimulus that is generally thought of as pleasing.

-Abby Jordan

Money Mike AKA Miguel said...

Its real nice it highlights the woman attributes like nice eyebrows straight,curly,and even messy hair its just highlights a woman face with nice light and shades in the face

jackie said...

I loved it! Like Anna, I too found it mesmerizing. I think my favorite pieces shown were the Da Vinci, Botticelli, and Renoir pieces. As for Da Vinco and Botticelli, I find their pieces to be captivating; Renoir more expressive.

I also recognized the Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, by Reynolds piece! I recently saw the movie, The Duchess, and afterward I researched Georgiana. Interesting story, if you're into history and liked the movie.

As represented by this video, societies have changed their way of visually thinking and ways of expressing their subjects. At the beginning of the video, the subjects included more of a religious undertone- Archangel, The Madonna, Birth of Venus. It then appears to take a more realist approach to subjects- perhaps just commissioned work of daughters and wives, as Glendon mentioned. And finally, towards the end the modernistic approach, which in sharing the opinion of Bianca, I believe lacks the passion of the Renaissance art.

Emily said...

I really enjoyed the video. The way all the women morphed into each other is amazing and really pulls you into the art. It really showed me that a lot of the women from certain periods had the same features. The way the women morphed showed off the brush strokes the artists used.

Anonymous said...

AJ Capleton said...
I liked the video of the Women In Art. It was an interesting visual based type of video with horrid violin based background music. Though the music was not so good, it was interesting. I am impressed with the techniques used by the video editor in connecting and merging the artworks. AMAZING! A++

Katrina said...

I love this video. It is absolutely captivating that throughout history, even though society's view of the "beautiful woman" has changed drastically, the presentation of the main facial features has remained somewhat continuous. I liked the women in the middle of the video the most because of their more classical beauty although I appreciate all of them equally. The modern artists I thought, were extremely expressive and I really appreciate their contribution to the last 500 years of western women art.

Anonymous said...

The Women in Art video was pretty nice. It was quite amazing how they were able to edit the video, and their faces, to where they can overlap each other after each painting in a professional manner. It's almost mesmerizing. But, more importantly, the art was astounding! All the women seem to come alive one after the other. Although, the last few pieces were not all that great. They seemed a little dull but overall the video was pretty good. Thanks!

----Kelcey De Lara. 6th period